Standards, Directives & Guidelines

A: The NFPA 79 fire prevention standard sets requirements applicable to electro technical equipment which is to be used in the USA and Canada. Accordingly, our products are NFPA 79-certified. The NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) standards apply to all appliances and machines in the USA and Canada. Compliance with these standards must be certified by a recognized laboratory. The components used in appliances and machines, such as cables, cable glands and connectors, are only accepted if they have been tested for the particular application they are being used for. Once they have been tested, they are given a conformity marking to show that they meet the required standards. When certified products are used, appliances and machines can be approved for use much more quickly, easily and cost-effectively. The cables, leads, cable glands and connectors manufactured by Lapp Kabel are not only certified to European standards, they are also approved for use in the US and Canadian markets. Lapp products can therefore be used worldwide.
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A: One of the main objectives of the 2006 revisions to the NFPA 79 standard (National Fire Protection Association) was to harmonize this standard with its European counterpart, IEC/EN 60204. The new version attaches great importance to cable and wire selection. This reflects the high levels of reliability and safety required of industrial equipment – such as machine tools or injection molding, woodworking and handling machines – as well as the frequently draconian impact of liability claims. The current 2007 edition of NFPA 79 expressly forbids the use of (UL-recognized) AWM cables in industrial machinery. As a result, approval is only granted to machines using cables with a so-called "UL listing" according to the American NEC (National Electrical Code). Red card for AWM cables Since the use of AWM cables in industrial machinery is strictly prohibited, machine and plant manufacturers have to adapt their development, planning and production processes accordingly. They need to make changes in development, planning and production because any machines that do not comply with the new NFPA 79 standard will not be certified for use. The consequences are significant because non-approval of a machine or plant usually results in high retrofit costs and even contractual penalties. There may also be a loss of customer trust and the company's reputation could be damaged. Caution with exceptions The new regulations contain exceptions, which permit the continued use of specific AWM cables, such as ÖLFLEX® 150 QUATTRO or ÖLFLEX® 191. However, these are discretionary exceptions that, in some cases, require a decision on an individual case basis by the machine certifying authority resp. National Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) or the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ). AWM cables may be accepted if they: • form part of a listed sensor/actuator box equipped with a connector and feed line • are separately inspected and approved by NRTLs • are routed in fully enclosed and UL-listed cable ducts or protective tubes The prerequisite for acceptance is a decision on the individual case by the NRTLs and AHJ. This not only causes a large amount of uncertainty until the point of approval, but also results in a significant loss of time and money if the exception is not granted. Green light for UL-listed products Safety first! To remain on the safe side from the outset and avoid any problems with US exports, UL-listed products should be used wherever possible. The 2007 edition of the NFPA 79 standard is not yet compulsory in all parts of the USA. However, this temporary period of limited validity will most likely end in 2010. Whether or not a cable is UL-listed (NFPA 79 compliant) or merely UL AWM recognized is indicated by the cable imprint or the certification mark on the relevant catalogue page.
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A: There are no separate UL certificates for ÖLFLEX® and UNITRONIC® cables detailing, for example, the product name and a description, as in the case of GL (Germanischer Lloyd) certificates for instance. Whether or not a cable is legitimately UL-certified is indicated by the normative element of the cable imprint. It must contain all UL AWM styles or UL listings for which the cable has been tested and certified. The UL file number (e.g. E63634 for U.I. Lapp), a code for the manufacturer or certificate owner, is usually found at the end of the cable imprint. A public UL database is available on the Internet at www.ul.com. By selecting "Certifications" and entering the file number in the relevant field, anybody can check whether the relevant cable manufacturer is certified by the UL authority and thus authorized to print an UL AWM style or UL listing on their products. This website can be used to search by file number or company name. Some 1000 available UL AWM styles (Appliance Wiring Material) are listed under the U.I. Lapp file number E63634 alone. UL-recognized and UL-listed cables are subject to very strict production controls. Manufacturers cannot simply produce cables with incorrect UL imprints and without the correct authorization or bring such products to market. The productions plants are periodically audited by UL inspectors, who check the accuracy of the imprint on UL-certified cables and take production samples for subsequent examination in the UL laboratory. With the UL labeling system, each drum of UL-certified cable is registered using special, sequentially numbered UL label stickers. These measures ensure that manufacturers only produce UL-imprinted cables for which they have UL authorization and have paid the necessary certification fees. If a customer requires a UL "certificate" for a specific ÖLFLEX® or UNITRONIC® cable, he can visit the aforementioned website and use the relevant file number to check the validity of the UL AWM styles or UL listings printed on the core insulation or cable outer sheath.
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A: IMDS (International Material Data System) is an archiving, exchange and management system for the automotive industry. It serves as the basis for the creation of material data sheets that list all materials and substances used in the relevant component as well as the necessary data required for the later recycling of the part. IMDS is the result of a collaborative effort involving Audi, BMW, Daimler, Chrysler, Ford, Opel, Porsche, Volkswagen and Volvo. Other automotive manufacturers have also since adopted the system. The aim of the IMDS system is to ensure compliance with national and international laws, which govern automotive manufacturers and suppliers in the form of standards and legal regulations, with a particular focus on environmental issues. Each vehicle manufacturer and supplier is responsible for all aspects of his product, including its entire lifecycle ranging from manufacture and use to recycling and disposal. In addition, manufacturers are required to declare the material composition of the products used in their vehicles, so that these can be reconstructed and classified into specific danger levels. Among other things, the International Material Data System is based on the end-of-life vehicle directive (ELV) of the European Parliament (directive 2000/53/EC) and of the German government. Customers can request IMDS data sheets for specific Lapp products from the PDL department (Laboratory Stuttgart); the following information must be provided: • Customer name and Lapp customer number • IMDS ID number of customer • Product name • Dimension or version • Lapp part number of product Based on these specification, the IMDS data sheet will be created and entered into the database, where it can be accessed by the customer using a corresponding ID number. As a rule, IMDS data sheets can only be created if the materials and substances in the relevant product comply with the global automotive declarable substance list (GADSL). However, this is the case for virtually all of our products. In some cases, it is not possible to issue IMDS data sheets for specific purchased vendor products, if these items were not entered in the IMDS database or released for entry by the relevant manufacturer. Further information about the IMDS International Material Data System is available at the following link: http://www.mdsystem.com
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A: In accordance with the revised standard VDE 0165, part 1, edition 05/2009 (EN 60079-14:2008), the following pages describe the possible selection of cables for explosive atmospheres on the basis of examples of normative construction design as well as of Lapp work standard products for the various applications. This document merely represents Lapp's interpretation of the specifications contained in the German version of the standard. However, in the absence of clear formulations and distinct terminology, this standard is both open to and in need of interpretation. As a result, this document in no way constitutes a legally binding interpretation. Ultimately, the selection of suitable cables for explosive atmospheres must always be made on the basis of specific local criteria regarding use and application. In cases of doubt, we recommend that the testing engineer/certifier responsible for the technical acceptance of the individual application be involved in the product selection process from an early stage.
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A: A number of ignition protection types exist to eliminate the dangers posed, for example, by ignitable sparks in explosive atmospheres. As well as for instance the use of pressure-resistant engine casings (ignition protection type d “drive enclosure”), this also includes amongst others intrinsic safety (ignition protection type i “intrinsic safety”). Intrinsic safety is a technical property, in which special construction principles are applied to prevent the occurrence of dangerous situations, even in the event of a fault. Electrical or electronic devices with ignition protection type "i" are used especially in explosive atmospheres for measurement and control purposes. Power is supplied to electrical equipment via a safety barrier, which limits the voltage and current such that the minimum ignition energy and temperature of an explosive gas, dust or vapor mixture is never reached. Intrinsically safe circuits are therefore used in explosive environments in which no sparks or thermal effects must occur that may ignite an explosive atmosphere. The operating voltage and current must not generate sufficient energy to cause an explosion.
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A: No, that is not strictly true. The relevant standard (VDE 0165) merely stipulates that cables in intrinsically safe circuits must be labeled accordingly so that they can be identified as part of such circuits. In cases where cables in intrinsically safe circuits are to be indicated by their color, the outer sheath must be light blue. Cables which do not have a blue sheath but are still used in intrinsically safe circuits must be identified by other means, to be agreed with the relevant testing engineer/certifier. This can be done, for example, using blue cable ducts or by affixing FLEXIMARK® marking products. In some cases, cables forming part of intrinsically safe circuits can also be installed such that they are spatially separated from other cables. An exception to these rules is when the intrinsically safe or all non-intrinsically safe cables and wires are armored, metal-sheathed or screened, in which case no separate identification of intrinsically safe cables and wires is required. The decision as to how cables are installed or distinguished in intrinsically safe environments must be made by the user in conjunction with the relevant testing institute.
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No written confirmations or certificates are available to verify that our cables, wires and accessories comply with these regulations and guidelines. The abundance of specifications regarding hazardous substances and environmental protection systems is requiring manufacturers to produce ever increasing numbers of certifications to verify their compliance with legal regulations. For this reason, we have revised table T30 in the technical appendix of our main catalogue to ensure that all REACH, RoHS, Deca-BDE und PFOS matters are comprehensively covered. Especially the international subject of REACH is constantly changing and undergoing permanent updates on our part. A summarized U.I. Lapp customer letter to be used for general REACH information purposes can be found at the following link: REACH Customer Information Further information about REACH and RoHS is available at the following links: http://echa.europa.eu http://www.rohs.eu
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Lapp offers a wide range of Wind Turbine Tray Cable (WTTC) per UL 2277 directive. ÖLFLEX® Fortis ÖLFLEX® Tray II ÖLFLEX® Control TM ÖLFLEX® TC 600 ÖLFLEX® VFD Slim ÖLFLEX® VFD Symmetrical ÖLFLEX® VFD with Brake ÖLFLEX® SDP ÖLFLEX® Auto I ÖLFLEX® Auto X
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A: The CE symbol identifies a product that conforms to a European Directive developed by a coalition of European countries that form the European Union (EU). This compliance is necessary for exporting certain cable types to countries within the European Community.
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A: No. The CE symbol identifies a product that conforms to a European directive adopted by a group of European countries that form the European Union or EU. This CE-rating is very similar to having a product in the USA as UL-listed. Harmonized cables signified usually by "HAR" are cables that meet common standards that were established by CENELEC (European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization) for all its member countries. Member countries include Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom.
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A: Overhead tray cables require UL TC-ER (Exposed Run) & CSA CIC/TC approval.
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A: Underwriters Laboratories Inc. is an independent nonprofit organization that writes and tests products for safety and certifies them. UL has developed more than 800 standards for safety, and millions of products and their components are tested to ULs safety standards. If a product is UL listed, you know it has passed ULs stringent tests for electrical safety. The Canadian Standards Association (CSA) is a nonprofit association serving business, industry, government and consumers in Canada and the global marketplace. Among many other activities, CSA develops standards that enhance public safety. A Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory, CSA is very familiar with U.S. requirements. According to OSHA regulations, the CSA-US Mark qualifies as an alternative to the UL Mark.
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REACH is the European Community Regulation on chemicals and their safe use (EC 1907/2006). It deals with the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances. The aim of REACH is to improve the protection of human health and the environment through the better and earlier identification of the intrinsic properties of chemical substances. At the same time, REACH aims to enhance innovation and competitiveness of the EU chemicals industry. The REACH Regulation places greater responsibility on industry to manage the risks from chemicals and to provide safety information on the substances. Manufacturers and importers are required to gather information on the properties of their chemical substances, which will allow their safe handling, and to register the information in a central database.
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